Transboundary Conservation Initiative

A framework for addressing key regional stressors and developing management outcomes for the following conservation priorities: 

 Native Salmonids

Native Salmonids

Bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout are found in the Crown. Increasing stream temperatures are expected to reduce the availability of suitable habitat for bull trout and increase levels of hybridization between westslope cutthroat trout and non-native trout species.

 Aquatic Invasive Species

Aquatic Invasive Species

Aquatic invasive species are non-native plants or animals that can have negative impacts on our health and threaten commercial, agricultural, aqua-cultural or recreational activities dependent on lakes and rivers in the Crown .

 Five Needle Pine

Five Needle Pine

Five needle pine forests anchor high mountain snowpacks an important function in face of climate change. These forests provide shade for high mountain snowpack, reducing erosion, which helps to regulate downstream flows.

 Meso Carnivores

Meso Carnivores

Mesocarnivores are mid sized to small mammalian species whose diet consists of 50-70% meat and the remainder is made up of non-vertebrate foods including fruit, fungi and other plant material. They are more numerous and more diverse than large carnivores.

 Terrestrial Invasive Species

Terrestrial Invasive Species

Terrestrial invasive plants are one of the largest threats to ecological integrity in the Crown.

We are working with partners to coordinate and align data and management for some of the region's top terrestrial invasive plants.

 Land Use Change

Land Use Change

The health of the wildlife populations that exist in the Crown is dependent on maintaining a landscape that allows wildlife species to move freely with minimum mortality from human related factors. In some cases connectivity for wildlife movement has been compromised.